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  • PostIntensiveCareSyndromeLibrary

    PostICU Library Index Name of Article, Video, Media, Etc. Type of media to be added COVID-19 Related Short Description of Media Joe and me Medical Research No Care of Critically Ill Patients With COVID-19 Medical Professional Education Yes Clinic aims to give surviving COVID-19 patients the post-ICU care they need Newspaper Article Yes Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients Are at High Risk of Post–Intensive Care Syndrome One-Pager Yes Post-Intensive Care Syndrome: What COVID-19 Survivors Could Face after Hospitalization One-Pager Yes COVID-19 patients are experiencing post-intensive care syndrome while adjusting to post-pandemic living Newspaper Article Yes Post-Intensive Care Syndrome After Coronavirus: What You Should Know Newspaper Article Yes Post-ICU Care for COVID Recovery Magazine Article Yes Post-COVID Conditions: Information for Healthcare Providers Medical Professional Education Yes Prevent Post-Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS) during COVID-19 Magazine Article Yes Page 1 of 208

  • A Population-Based Observational Study of Intensive Care Unit–Related Outcomes

    Click to Return to Search Page VIEW SELECTED LIBRARY MEDIA Name of Media: A Population-Based Observational Study of Intensive Care Unit–Related Outcomes Author(s): Allan Garland, Kendiss Olafson, Clare D. Ramsey, Marina Yogendran, and Randall Fransoo Publisher or Source: Annals of the American Thoracic Society Type of Media: Medical Research Media Originally for: Critical Care Physicians, General Medical Professionals, Nurses and/or Other Critical Care Medical Professionals Country of Origin: Canada Primary Focus of Media: Pre-Use of PICS Designation COVID-19 Related: No Description: Rationale: Many studies of critical illness outcomes have been restricted to short-term outcomes, selected diagnoses, and patients in one or a few intensive care units (ICUs). Objectives: Evaluate a range of relevant outcomes in a population-based cohort of patients admitted to ICUs. Methods: Among all adult residents of the Canadian province of Manitoba admitted to ICUs over a 9-year period, we assessed ICU, hospital, 30-day, and 180-day mortality rates; ICU and hospital lengths-of-stay; post-hospital use of hospital care, ICU care, outpatient physician care, medications, and home care; and post-hospital residence location. We explored data stratified by age, sex, and separate categories of geocoded income for urban and rural residents. For post-hospital use variables we compared ICU patients with those admitted to hospitals without the need for ICU care. Measurements and Main Results: After ICU admission there was a high initial death rate, which declined between 30 and 180 days and thereafter remained at the lower value. Hospital mortality was 19.0%, with 21.7% dying within 6 months of ICU admission. Women had higher hospital mortality than men To view the PDF, Article, Photo, or Chart, Click Icon: To view the attached Video media file, Click Icon: PostICU, Inc's library staff reviewed this copyrighted material contained in the library and reasonably believes that its inclusion in our library complies with the "Fair Use Doctrine" because: (1) our library's is for nonprofit and educational purposes; (2) the nature of the copyrighted work is related to our mission; (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole is fair and reasonable; and (4) the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work will if impacted, should be enhanced, by its presence in our library.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup April 17, 2020

    Click to Return to Search Page VIEW SELECTED LIBRARY MEDIA Name of Media: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup April 17, 2020 Author(s): FDA Publisher or Source: FDA Type of Media: One-Pager Media Originally for: Critical Care Physicians,General Public,General Medical Professionals,Nurses and/or Other Critical Care Medical Professionals Country of Origin: United States of America (the) Primary Focus of Media: Pre-Use of PICS Designation COVID-19 Related: Yes Description: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration ( on April 17, 2020) announced the following actions taken in its ongoing response effort to the COVID-19 pandemic To view the PDF, Article, Photo, or Chart, Click Icon: To view the attached Video media file, Click Icon: PostICU, Inc's library staff reviewed this copyrighted material contained in the library and reasonably believes that its inclusion in our library complies with the "Fair Use Doctrine" because: (1) our library's is for nonprofit and educational purposes; (2) the nature of the copyrighted work is related to our mission; (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole is fair and reasonable; and (4) the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work will if impacted, should be enhanced, by its presence in our library.

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Blog Posts (4)

  • New PICS Group on LinkedIn

    There's a new group listed on LinkedIn titled Post Intensive Care Syndrome. Here is a link to view and join this group: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12658739 Our group's first goal is to spread the news about our group, and to recruit as many members as possible. We're excited at the prospect of having a large community of post intensive care syndrome LinkedIn group members for a number of reasons: To provide educational resources to former ICU patients, their caregivers & families, the medical community, and the public. To share our belief that everyone in the medical community that provides direct care to people in the ICU, and that is involved in the aftercare of former ICU patients, plays an important role in the process of educating themselves, their peers and their patients about PICS symptoms. To provide education to everyone about the fact that PICS is a major health crisis. To recruit new group members to help educate group members. To encourage former ICU patients and their family members, with LinkedIn accounts, to join this group. ​ With the support of a growing group membership, we hope to position ourselves as a group with clout necessary to "get a seat at the table with decision-makers" at critical care organizations, hospitals, and health insurance companies. Should we be fortunate enough to get a "seat at the table," we hope to position ourselves to solicit advice from this group to share with decision makers about about commonsense solutions to help solved this complex but solvable medical, financial, sociological, problem. Our group also hopes to plans to enhance our existing library of articles, research, locations of PICS treatments centers, and other materials and information about the PICS. We'll ask group members to help us collect materials from PICS researchers, ICU physicians & nurses and others detailing the PICS symptoms to be aware of, availability of PICS clinical in your area and other treatment options. We'll also ask members to help us fashion surveys for our membership on a multitude of topics to find out what our majority finds to be the most important avenues for us to pursue together. If you'd like to participate in the leadership of this group or as an Admin, please drop us a message, at your convenience. Thank you!

  • #3: PICS Research Booms

    Every year, more than 6 million patients are discharged from intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States (U.S.). At least one-third and as many as 80% experience a range of physical, cognitive and mental impairments associated with post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). Many of these patients still need care years after leaving the ICU. These numbers suggest that millions of people are currently afflicted with PICS, many with long term consequences. Moreover, thousands of survivors of the COVID-19 pandemic are facing symptoms similar to PICS long after their “recoveries” are thought to be complete. Given its pervasiveness and severity, what is the medical profession doing to identify, understand and treat PICS? PostICU.org has been tracking medical research journals to answer this question. For several years, we have been searching a number of on-line databases of peer-reviewed medical journals worldwide to find relevant articles. One of these, PubMed, has proven to be a particularly accessible database for the nonprofessional investigator. Founded in 1996, PubMed is a free resource supporting the search and retrieval of biomedical and life sciences literature. PubMed is maintained by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). Its database contains more than 30 million peer-reviewed journal citations. The full text of roughly one-quarter of these articles are open access publications available to the public at no charge. In 2012, less than two years after the seminal Society of Critical Care Medicine meeting that first defined PICS, the first four articles appeared in the PubMed database,. Since then, PICS has become a steady and now rapidly growing focus of medical research. This is shown in the following graph. A small handful of medical journal articles about PICS were published over the years from 2012 to 2015, after which the numbers began to shoot up dramatically. New PICS articles added to the PubMed database jumped from five in 2015 to 23 in 2016. In the last four years, the annual total has nearly quadrupled to an estimated 90 articles in 2020. In total, the PubMed database included 209 PICS articles as of November 1, 2020. Over 40% have been published in the last year. Most of the early articles tried to quantify the number of post-ICU patients afflicted with PICS and the distribution of various physical, mental and cognitive impairments among them. Many also focused on the expansion of protocols used by ICU nurses to include new and enhanced procedures to reduce delirium, enhance mobility and avoid other likely precursors of PICS. As the PICS knowledge base expanded, the medical community began to propose and test specific strategies to treat PICS patients in randomized controlled trials.These include establishment of post-ICU recovery centers specifically designed to help PICS patients.Other strategies include creating a network of peer support groups, including on-line groups, where PICS sufferers can talk freely among themselves.Another idea encourages ICU patients to maintain a diary of their experiences, worries and fears, with contributions by their families and ICU nurses, and continuing during post-discharge recovery.These topics will be examined more closely in future Jim’s Blogs.

  • #2: SCCM Builds a Foundation

    The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) did a lot of the heavy lifting in designating post-intensive care syndrome (PICS) as a distinct medical condition. This makes sense. Every PICS sufferer was once critically ill and treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). SCCM continued to lead after the 2010 inaugural PICS meeting, helping to build a place for PICS in the medical hierarchy. Early work was done by three task forces established during the initial meeting. They met periodically and presented reports at the Second PICS Stakeholders Meeting, also organized by SCCM, and held on September 24 and 25, 2012. After the presentations by the three task groups, attendees incorporated their respective recommendations into a single PICS Action Plan to guide future work. By then, the Awareness and Education Task Group had already published an information brochure and several videos on PICS. It had established an internet site about PICS called MyICUcare.com and it inserted a PICS definition into Wikipedia’s encyclopedia. With input from ICU survivors with PICS, an earlier SCCM brochure on leaving the ICU was modified to include a checklist of questions to identify when symptoms should be reported for follow-up medical care. Given that patients themselves may be unable to process complex information at their ICU discharge, the brochure was designed as much to help family members as the patients themselves. The Barriers Task Group recommended promoting the concept of “functional reconciliation,” making formal comparisons of a patient’s functional capabilities before hospitalization with their post-ICU status. This new concept included a checklist of physical, cognitive and mental health conditions and included case managers to ease transition of care and referral to appropriate care providers. Topics studied by the Research Task Group included partnering with other national organizations working on PICS, such as the Critical Care Societies Collaborative and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The group also recommended seeking funding sources, including NIH institutes, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and various foundations. The Research Task Group also identified topics where further evidence was required to support a sound understanding of patient recovery from PICS. The group urged future research strategies to include a patient-centered focus, and include long-term outcome measures into studies. Development of datasets of patient-level data would benefit both research and practice evaluations, it concluded. At the second meeting in 2012, the number of stakeholder groups grew to 25, from 15 in 2010, and the total number of attendees expanded from 31 to 40. Like the early meeting, most attendees were medical professionals. Importantly, two ICU survivors with PICS were invited to attend the second meeting as patient advocates. This was one of the first and, unfortunately, still rare inclusions of PICS patients in medical decisionmaking. A fuller discussion of the SCCM Second Stakeholders Conference on PICS appears in an article published in Critical Care Medicine in December 2014 entitled “Exploring the Scope of Post-Intensive Care Syndrome Therapy and Care: Engagement of Non-Critical Care Providers and Survivors in a Second Stakeholders Meeting.”The article is included in the PostICU library on this website.

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Services (2)

  • PICS Expert Consultation

    Meet with one of our non-medical professionals to ask any questions about PICS, available services, our research library, articles and other materials of interest, PICS Clinics, etc.

  • PICS Group Discussion

    Opportunity to chat with other former ICU patients and their family members about ICU and post ICU experiences.

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PostICU Library Policy & Compliance Statement

PostICU, Inc's library staff reviewed this copyrighted material contained in the library and reasonably believes that its inclusion in our library complies with the "Fair Use Doctrine" because: (1) our library's is for nonprofit and educational purposes; (2) the nature of the copyrighted work is related to our mission; (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole is fair and reasonable; and (4) the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work will if impacted, should be enhanced, by its presence in our library.

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