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  • the bmj|BMJ 2021;372:n436 | doi: 10.1136/bmj.n4361State of the art reVIeWSevere covid-19 pneumonia: pathogenesis and clinical management

    Click to Return to Search Page VIEW SELECTED LIBRARY MEDIA Name of Media: the bmj|BMJ 2021;372:n436 | doi: 10.1136/bmj.n4361State of the art reVIeWSevere covid-19 pneumonia: pathogenesis and clinical management Author(s): Amy H Attaway, Rachel G Scheraga, Adarsh Bhimraj, Michelle Biehl, Umur Hatipoğlu Publisher or Source: The BMJ Type of Media: Medical Journal Media Originally for: Critical Care Physicians,General Medical Professionals,Nurses and/or Other Critical Care Medical Professionals Country of Origin: United States of America (the) Primary Focus of Media: Post Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS) COVID-19 Related: Yes Description: Severe covid-19 pneumonia has posed critical challenges for the research and medical communities. Older age, male sex, and comorbidities increase the risk for severe disease. For people hospitalized with covid-19, 15-30% will go on to develop covid-19 associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (CARDS). Autopsy studies of patients who died of severe SARS CoV-2 infection reveal presence of diffuse alveolar damage consistent with ARDS but with a higher thrombus burden in pulmonary capillaries. When used appropriately, high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) may allow CARDS patients to avoid intubation, and does not increase risk for disease transmission. During invasive mechanical ventilation, low tidal volume ventilation and positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration to optimize oxygenation are recommended. Dexamethasone treatment improves mortality for the treatment of severe and critical covid-19, while remdesivir may have modest benefit in time to recovery in patients with severe disease but shows no statistically significant benefit in mortality or other clinical outcomes. Covid-19 survivors, especially patients with ARDS, are at high risk for long term physical and mental impairments, and an interdisciplinary approach is essential for critical illness recovery. To view the PDF, Article, Photo, or Chart, Click Icon: To view the attached Video media file, Click Icon: PostICU, Inc's library staff reviewed this copyrighted material contained in the library and reasonably believes that its inclusion in our library complies with the "Fair Use Doctrine" because: (1) our library's is for nonprofit and educational purposes; (2) the nature of the copyrighted work is related to our mission; (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole is fair and reasonable; and (4) the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work will if impacted, should be enhanced, by its presence in our library.

  • OHSU starting specialized program to help treat COVID-19 long-haulers

    Click to Return to Search Page VIEW SELECTED LIBRARY MEDIA Name of Media: OHSU starting specialized program to help treat COVID-19 long-haulers Author(s): Morgan Romero Publisher or Source: KGW.com Type of Media: Newspaper Article Media Originally for: General Public Country of Origin: United States of America (the) Primary Focus of Media: Post Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS) COVID-19 Related: Yes Description: PORTLAND, Ore. — Millions of Americans survive COVID-19, but lingering symptoms can stay with them for months. At Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), there's a new program to try to treat patients considered long-haulers. It's one of dozens that has opened, or will be opening, in the U.S., as reported by NBC News. So far, it's the only specialized post-COVID clinic we know of in the state of Oregon. OHSU is finalizing its Long COVID-19 Program, which it hopes to launch in about a month. It's a specialized, coordinated approach to care for Oregonians dealing with an illness that doesn't have a known cure, now labeled Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC). To view the PDF, Article, Photo, or Chart, Click Icon: To view the attached Video media file, Click Icon: PostICU, Inc's library staff reviewed this copyrighted material contained in the library and reasonably believes that its inclusion in our library complies with the "Fair Use Doctrine" because: (1) our library's is for nonprofit and educational purposes; (2) the nature of the copyrighted work is related to our mission; (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole is fair and reasonable; and (4) the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work will if impacted, should be enhanced, by its presence in our library.

  • Why 'presumed recovered' doesn't mean you're done with the coronavirus

    Click to Return to Search Page VIEW SELECTED LIBRARY MEDIA Name of Media: Why 'presumed recovered' doesn't mean you're done with the coronavirus Author(s): Woodruff, E. Publisher or Source: The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans Advocate Type of Media: Newspaper Article Media Originally for: General Public Country of Origin: United States Primary Focus of Media: PICS and PICS-F COVID-19 Related: Yes Description: Young, healthy people can suffer for far longer than even a bad flu, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study found. One in five adults between the ages of 18 and 34 said they didn't feel back to normal two or three weeks after their diagnosis. "A lot of people don't realize, even if the virus is gone, that doesn't mean you're done with it," said Sullivan. "It's done its damage." To view the PDF, Article, Photo, or Chart, Click Icon: To view the attached Video media file, Click Icon: PostICU, Inc's library staff reviewed this copyrighted material contained in the library and reasonably believes that its inclusion in our library complies with the "Fair Use Doctrine" because: (1) our library's is for nonprofit and educational purposes; (2) the nature of the copyrighted work is related to our mission; (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole is fair and reasonable; and (4) the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work will if impacted, should be enhanced, by its presence in our library.

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Blog Posts (5)

  • Navigating Life After ICU: Strategies for Post-ICU Recovery

    As professionals in the healthcare industry, we understand the challenges individuals face post-intensive care unit (ICU) discharge. The journey from ICU to post-ICU life can be daunting, filled with various physical and emotional hurdles. In this blog post, we aim to provide valuable insights and strategies to help professionals and individuals navigate life after ICU, specifically focusing on Post-Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS). Understanding Post-Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS) PICS is a condition that affects patients who have been discharged from the ICU. It encompasses a range of physical, cognitive, and mental health issues that can persist long after the initial critical illness. Recent research about PICS highlights the importance of recognizing and addressing these ongoing challenges faced by ICU survivors. Strategies for Recovery Based on user insights and site activity data provided by PostICU, we have compiled effective strategies to aid in post-ICU recovery: Joining the "PICS Group Discussion" offered by PostICU provides a supportive environment for sharing experiences and seeking guidance from individuals who have gone through similar challenges. Engaging with peers can significantly impact one's recovery journey. The "PICS Expert Consultation" service enables individuals to ask questions, access resources, and receive expert advice on managing PICS. Consulting with non-medical professionals can offer valuable insights and support for a smoother recovery process. The availability of online booking for services on the PostICU platform ensures easy access to group discussions and expert consultations. This user-friendly feature enhances convenience and promotes better engagement with the supportive resources provided. Empowering Individuals to Thrive PostICU's commitment to creating a safe space for individuals affected by PICS is commendable. Through a combination of informative blog posts, interactive services, and a strong community network, PostICU empowers individuals to thrive beyond their ICU experiences. Conclusion In conclusion, the transition from ICU to post-ICU life is a critical phase that requires support, guidance, and understanding. PostICU's dedication to offering services that cater to the diverse needs of individuals recovering from critical illness is truly impactful. By leveraging the resources, support systems, and strategies discussed in this post, professionals and individuals can embark on a path towards holistic recovery and improved well-being. Let's continue to navigate life after ICU together, one step at a time. Harnessing personal insights and site activity data, this blog post is tailored to professionals seeking to enhance their understanding of PICS and support individuals in their post-ICU recovery journey.

  • New PICS Group on LinkedIn

    There's a new group listed on LinkedIn titled Post Intensive Care Syndrome. Here is a link to view and join this group: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12658739 Our group's first goal is to spread the news about our group, and to recruit as many members as possible. We're excited at the prospect of having a large community of post intensive care syndrome LinkedIn group members for a number of reasons: To provide educational resources to former ICU patients, their caregivers & families, the medical community, and the public. To share our belief that everyone in the medical community that provides direct care to people in the ICU, and that is involved in the aftercare of former ICU patients, plays an important role in the process of educating themselves, their peers and their patients about PICS symptoms. To provide education to everyone about the fact that PICS is a major health crisis. To recruit new group members to help educate group members. To encourage former ICU patients and their family members, with LinkedIn accounts, to join this group. ​ With the support of a growing group membership, we hope to position ourselves as a group with clout necessary to "get a seat at the table with decision-makers" at critical care organizations, hospitals, and health insurance companies. Should we be fortunate enough to get a "seat at the table," we hope to position ourselves to solicit advice from this group to share with decision makers about about commonsense solutions to help solved this complex but solvable medical, financial, sociological, problem. Our group also hopes to plans to enhance our existing library of articles, research, locations of PICS treatments centers, and other materials and information about the PICS. We'll ask group members to help us collect materials from PICS researchers, ICU physicians & nurses and others detailing the PICS symptoms to be aware of, availability of PICS clinical in your area and other treatment options. We'll also ask members to help us fashion surveys for our membership on a multitude of topics to find out what our majority finds to be the most important avenues for us to pursue together. If you'd like to participate in the leadership of this group or as an Admin, please drop us a message, at your convenience. Thank you!

  • #3: PICS Research Booms

    Every year, more than 6 million patients are discharged from intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States (U.S.). At least one-third and as many as 80% experience a range of physical, cognitive and mental impairments associated with post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). Many of these patients still need care years after leaving the ICU. These numbers suggest that millions of people are currently afflicted with PICS, many with long term consequences. Moreover, thousands of survivors of the COVID-19 pandemic are facing symptoms similar to PICS long after their “recoveries” are thought to be complete. Given its pervasiveness and severity, what is the medical profession doing to identify, understand and treat PICS? PostICU.org has been tracking medical research journals to answer this question. For several years, we have been searching a number of on-line databases of peer-reviewed medical journals worldwide to find relevant articles. One of these, PubMed, has proven to be a particularly accessible database for the nonprofessional investigator. Founded in 1996, PubMed is a free resource supporting the search and retrieval of biomedical and life sciences literature. PubMed is maintained by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). Its database contains more than 30 million peer-reviewed journal citations. The full text of roughly one-quarter of these articles are open access publications available to the public at no charge. In 2012, less than two years after the seminal Society of Critical Care Medicine meeting that first defined PICS, the first four articles appeared in the PubMed database,. Since then, PICS has become a steady and now rapidly growing focus of medical research. This is shown in the following graph. A small handful of medical journal articles about PICS were published over the years from 2012 to 2015, after which the numbers began to shoot up dramatically. New PICS articles added to the PubMed database jumped from five in 2015 to 23 in 2016. In the last four years, the annual total has nearly quadrupled to an estimated 90 articles in 2020. In total, the PubMed database included 209 PICS articles as of November 1, 2020. Over 40% have been published in the last year. Most of the early articles tried to quantify the number of post-ICU patients afflicted with PICS and the distribution of various physical, mental and cognitive impairments among them. Many also focused on the expansion of protocols used by ICU nurses to include new and enhanced procedures to reduce delirium, enhance mobility and avoid other likely precursors of PICS. As the PICS knowledge base expanded, the medical community began to propose and test specific strategies to treat PICS patients in randomized controlled trials.These include establishment of post-ICU recovery centers specifically designed to help PICS patients.Other strategies include creating a network of peer support groups, including on-line groups, where PICS sufferers can talk freely among themselves.Another idea encourages ICU patients to maintain a diary of their experiences, worries and fears, with contributions by their families and ICU nurses, and continuing during post-discharge recovery.These topics will be examined more closely in future Jim’s Blogs.

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Products (17)

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Services (2)

  • PICS Expert Consultation

    Meet with one of our non-medical professionals to ask any questions about PICS, available services, our research library, articles and other materials of interest, PICS Clinics, etc.

  • PICS Group Discussion

    Opportunity to chat with other former ICU patients and their family members about ICU and post ICU experiences.

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PostICU Library Policy & Compliance Statement

PostICU, Inc's library staff reviewed this copyrighted material contained in the library and reasonably believes that its inclusion in our library complies with the "Fair Use Doctrine" because: (1) our library's is for nonprofit and educational purposes; (2) the nature of the copyrighted work is related to our mission; (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole is fair and reasonable; and (4) the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work will if impacted, should be enhanced, by its presence in our library.

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