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Name of Media:

The Functional Status Questionnaire: Reliability and Validity When Used in Primary Care

Author(s):

ALAN M. JETTE, PhD; ALLYSON R. DAVIES, PhD; PAUL D. CLEARY, PhD; DAVID R. CALKINS, MD, MPP; LISA V. RUBENSTEIN, MD; ARLENE FINK, PhD; JACQUELINE KOSECOFF, PhD; ROY T. YOUNG, MD; ROBERT H. BROOK, MD; and THOMAS L. DELBANCO, MD.

Publisher or Source:

Journal of General Internal Medicine

Type of Media:

Medical Journal

Media Originally for:

Critical Care Physicians, General Medical Professionals, Nurses and/or Other Critical Care Medical Professionals

Country of Origin:

United States

Primary Focus of Media:

Pre-Use of PICS Designation

COVID-19 Related:

No

Description:

A comprehensive functional assessment requires thorough and careful inquiry, which is difficult to accomplish in most busy clinical practices. This paper examines the reliability and validity of the Functional Status Questionnaire (FSQ), a brief, standardized, self-administered questionnaire designed to provide a comprehensive and feasible assessment of physical, psychological, social and role function in ambulatory patients. The FSQ can be completed and computer-scored in minutes to produce a one-page report which includes six summated-rating scale scores and six single-item scores. The clinician can use this report both to screen for and to monitor patients" functional status. In this study, the FSQ was administered to 49? regular users of Boston's Beth Israel Hospital's Healthcare Associates and 656 regular users of 76 internal medicine practices in Los Angeles. The data demonstrate that the FSQ produces reliable sub-scales with construct validity. The authors believe the FSQ addresses many of the problems behind the slow diffusion into primary care of systematic functional assessment.

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